All posts filed under: American Foreign Policy

Huntsman Speaks, Romney Thumps, Biden Eats

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American Foreign Policy / U.S.-China Relations

Huntsman the Diplomat Jon Huntsman is a Republican running for his party’s nomination for President of the United States.  He is the former governor of Utah, the most recent former Ambassador to the People’s Republic of China and has, by all accounts, an impressive resumé when it comes to foreign policy. Here is Huntsman in a long interview with Phoenix TV (a not state-owned, but usually self-censoring station) in Beijing.  Around 19’30” he breaks into […]

Yuanhai Fangwei [远海防卫]: Observing China’s Navy

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American Foreign Policy / China / Chinese nationalism / Huanqiu Shibao / Japan / Sino-Japanese Relations / U.S.-China Relations / US-Japan relations

Back in the American defense belt of Orange County, I’m reading Kissinger and reflecting on the extensive annual report to Congress from the Pentagon regarding Chinese military capabilities.  The full text of the report is here. One minor advantage of the financial focus of VP Biden’s public remarks in China from 17-21 August was that the normal drum-beating on the security front relented, but only slightly so; the temporary disengagement from security and military competition […]

“US-China Musical Diplomacy” at the US Consulate in Chengdu

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American Foreign Policy / Cello / China / Chinese nationalism / Cultural Politics / East Asian modernity / Music / U.S.-China Relations

  25 July 2011 Dr. Adam Cathcart Sino-U.S Relations Lecture at the Chengdu U.S Consulate [Transcription by Mycal Ford, Pacific Lutheran University] Part I: Conflict and Culture: It is often thought that the answer to conflict is culture (wenming). The notion that we should focus on culture to become calm and ease tensions is especially true in China, with its emphasis on “harmony” (hexie), but maybe not throughout the world. “The more cultural exchange the better […]

A Little Musical Diplomacy

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American Foreign Policy / Cello / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations

China is presently thundering its way into some heavily-historically-documented commemorations of the 60th anniversary of the PLA’s arrival in Tibet, while at the same time bringing the rhetorical hammer down in a headline Huanqiu op-ed unsubtly entitled “The West, Sympathizers to ‘Xinjiang Independence’ Terrorism.”  As assertive nationalism and an emphasis on “social stability” (and the threats that forces external to China pose to the country’s unity) pose he only thing the Chinese Communist Party leadership […]

33 Questions on The History of Modern Tibet

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American Foreign Policy / Chinese communist party / Cultural Politics / Tibet

Here on Sinologistical Violoncellist, the subject of Tibet seems to be coming up with greater frequency, as it ought to.  After all, the Dalai Lama remains floating through the universe (and the halls of Congress, Richard Gere in tow) dropping rhetorical bombs on Beijing, and Zhongnanhai makes no bones about shutting off all avenues of dialog with the 14th reincarnation. And thus, apropos of well, this, allow me to state that people who have not […]

Kim Jong Il in China: 28 Things You May Have Missed

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American Foreign Policy / China / Chinese communist party / East Asian modernity / Manchuria / North Korea / North Korean border region / Sino-North Korean relations / US-North Korea relations / Yanbian / 新闻自由

Cross-Border Economic Development 1. Indeed, the Rodong Sinmun [劳动新闻/Worker’s Daily], North Korea’s key ideological mouthpiece, has said nothing of Kim Jong Il’s since his junket to a Hamgyong fruityard. But what has flowered in place of news of Kim?  The halls of Pyongyang, at least the ones with lighting, are suddenly again flush with economic optimism. The phrases present in this Rodong Sinmun, May 20, editorial had gone into deep remission.  The North Korean leadership, we can […]