All posts tagged: Ai Weiwei

Cultural Power Battle Threads

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Art / China / Chinese communist party / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations / Sino-German Relations / U.S.-China Relations / 新闻自由

- The Telegraph reports in alarmist fashion about Hu Jintao warning, as the newspaper headline puts it, of “cultural warfare from the West” - A closer examination of the story indicates that Hu Jintao’s “battle cry,” above, was a speech given on October 18, 2011, that was republished yesterday in the preemminent journal for CCP theory, Qiushi (Seeking Truth / 求是). In fact most of the speech is not at all about the West, but the […]

Two New Essays on China Beat: Sino-German and Sino-Korean Relations

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Chinese Avant-Garde / Chinese communist party / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations / German / Huanqiu Shibao / My Publications / North Korea / Op-Ed / Sino-German Relations

I’ve got a few more changes in store for Sinologistical Violoncellist in the new year (most of them involving the bass clef and Japan, not necessarily in that order), but in the meantime, readers may appreciate being directed to two longer essays I recently published on China Beat, cited here in modified Chicago style: Adam Cathcart, “Bow Before the Portrait: Sino-North Korean Relations Enter the Kim Jong Eun Era,” The China Beat, December 23, 2011. […]

Reevaluating Ai Weiwei: Guest Commentary

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Art / Beijing / Chinese Avant-Garde / Cultural Politics

This guest posting comes from the sizzling keyboard of Paul Manfredi, head of the Chinese Studies Program at Pacific Lutheran University and the author of China Avant Garde, one of the Internet’s best analytical stops for insights into the Chinese contemporary art scene.  Manfredi’s blog is a rich blend of image and word, and highly recommended.  My apologies, by the way, to readers for taking so long to post this essay which I received several […]

Lux Sinica: China’s Civilizing Influence in North Korea

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Cultural Politics / East Asian modernity / Huanqiu Shibao / North Korean border region / Sino-North Korean relations / Yanbian

It takes more than a few days, or perhaps a few weeks, to sift through all the reports, speculation, and rumors surrounding Kim Jong Il’s “new deal” with China.  At the end of the day, though, it seems that a single question aids in interpreting the phenomenon: To what extent has Kim Jong Il’s visit to China spurred the North Korean regime to embrace even the appearance of a reformist direction?  In other words, is […]

Ai Weiwei and Sino-German Relations

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Art / Beijing / China / Chinese Avant-Garde / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations / German / Sino-German Relations

For the last two months, a stack of German newspapers and internet print-outs about the case of Ai Weiwei seems to have accrued first in my bags in Berlin and Paris and then in my offices in Seattle and Tacoma.  What a treasure-trove of perceptions and misperceptions, opportunity and loss, of connection do these papers constitute!  In a fantasy world that demands little more than internet and newspaper commentaries from the East Asia professoriat, the […]

Huanqiu Shibao on Ai Weiwei

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Art / China / Chinese Avant-Garde / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations / German / Huanqiu Shibao / Sino-German Relations

[Update: A rather comprehensive analysis of Huanqiu's Ai Weiwei coverage, as of April 8, can be found here via the scrupulous work of JustRecently.] Imagine my surprise, when, today, I opened my friendly neighborhood Huanqiu Shibao website only to find an article about detained artist Ai Weiwei right there in a very prominent position.  This latest one describes how German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been denying Der Spiegel reports that she called for the release […]

Analysing the Limits of Soft Power in the Case of Ai Weiwei: Der Tagesspiegel

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Art / Beijing / Chinese Avant-Garde / Chinese communist party / Cultural Politics / EU-East Asia relations / German / Sino-German Relations

As promised, I am working my way through some of the prolix torrent of analysis and concern levied upon the case of Ai Weiwei by authors in Germany, and by German authors in China. In general, the confrontation between Germany and China over cultural matters and human rights seems now primed to grow exponentially.  Museum directors are now musing openly about bringing the Enlightenment exhibition back home to Germany, and elites are wondering how in […]