Mao Zedong and Korean War Propaganda: Nianpu Notes, Jan. 1951 (2)

New sources published in Beijing this past December give us further insight into Mao Zedong’s multifarious activities and ongoing strategic activities with respect to the Korean War. In addition to covering in some detail Mao’s active policy direction for the Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries, the consolidation of Tibet, and land reform, the Mao Zedong Nianpu (Chronology) discuss information operations in and around Korea. Given the kind of … Continue reading Mao Zedong and Korean War Propaganda: Nianpu Notes, Jan. 1951 (2)

Discussing the Korean War at AAS 2014

My panel, entitled “Utilizing the Captured Documents: New Perspectives on Society, Institutions, and Foreign Relations in Revolutionary and Wartime North Korea, 1945-1953,” has been accepted for the March 27-30 2014 annual meeting of the Association of Asian Studies. The panel, organized by Chuck Kraus at George Washington University, will feature Bruce Cumings (the foremost scholar of the war), myself, Chuck Kraus, and Youngjun Kim. Abstract: … Continue reading Discussing the Korean War at AAS 2014

Bombing North Korea

via Curtis Melvin: Naturally, the air fields employed for the bombing were not in South Korea, but instead Japan. For more information on Japanese roles in the Korean War, the tremendous scholar Tessa Morris-Suzuki recently released an incredible research paper: Tessa Morris-Suzuki, “Post-War Warriors: Japanese Combatants in the Korean War,” | 「戦後の軍人−朝鮮戦争で戦った日本人戦士」 , Japan Focus, July 30, 2012. Continue reading Bombing North Korea

North Korea: Examination Materials

I recently completed a month-long lecture series on North Korean-Chinese relations at Pacific Lutheran University.  Because these lectures were occasioned by a course I teach at PLU, I had the pleasure of writing an exam on the topic. Here, in no particular order, are a few of themes or questions which were covered in the lectures and which my students consequently suggested that I should … Continue reading North Korea: Examination Materials

Perils of the Non-Verified and the Fictional: Just Another Week in News from North Korea

Why did it take me this long to figure it out?  With the exception of Sunny Lee, no news reporter who writes in English, who is based in Beijing or Seoul or Washington, whose job it is to report on North Korea, actually reads the Chinese-language press about North Korea. How else to explain the void in this story about a train from Sinuiju, which … Continue reading Perils of the Non-Verified and the Fictional: Just Another Week in News from North Korea

Obedient, Intransigent North Korea in the Chinese Media

Thanks to the ever-productive Joshua Stanton at the very useful but hopelessly Anglophone (and somewhat impervious) command post for North Korean counter-revolution known as One Free Korea, I got motivated to do some more analysis of Chinese sources touching upon the recent flare-up in the sea to the west (and north!) of the DMZ in Korea. As I see it, Chinese media strategy as regards … Continue reading Obedient, Intransigent North Korea in the Chinese Media

Contested Era, Blossoming Memory: Reconsidering the Early 1950s in the Present PRC

In walking around Chinese book markets, perusing Chinese newspapers, talking to Chinese scholars and intellectuals, and just plain thinking here in the PRC, the remarkable fact emerges of the enormous gap between what is printed and discussed here and how we talk about it back in the West. In other words, there are some thorny themes being worked out here in the PRC that seem … Continue reading Contested Era, Blossoming Memory: Reconsidering the Early 1950s in the Present PRC

Links for July 30, 2010

As a stand-in for more narrative and original blog posts when I get back from “vacation,” please enjoy the following links in three categories: Mao’s Forgotten Son, The Korean War Remembered Photos History education: 140+ photos of Korea before the war http://history.huanqiu.com/photo/2010-04/778072_2.html New photos of Mao Anying, Mao Zedong’s son translating for Russians in Beijing, May 1950, just six months before he was killed by … Continue reading Links for July 30, 2010

Stories to Follow

I recommend you watch how these stories develop, since most of them have yet to be really reported in the Anglophone press: 1. Legacies of Japanese imperialism in Manchuria Chinese government organizations and affiliated NGOs are engaged in a struggle to get the old Unit 731 facility (the commemorative site for Japanese biological weapons research and atrocities outside of northeastern city of Harbin) listed as … Continue reading Stories to Follow

China’s Renewed Interest in Korean War Origins

The Telegraph in London writes of the heightened drive in Beijing to assess the origins of the Korean War, a conflict now being cast in an increasingly negative light insofar as North Korea’s responsibilities are concerned: The official Chinese media stated for the first time that it was North Korea that dealt the first blow. In a special report, Xinhua’s International Affairs journal said: “On … Continue reading China’s Renewed Interest in Korean War Origins